How can sustainable sanitary products be supported?

Disposable nappies, incontinence products, tampons, sanitary towels etc often slip under the “plastics” radar but are one of the worst offender.

Reusable silicon menstrual cups, washable nappies, washable pads and “period pants” are available so an easy win would be to promote the hell out of them to raise awareness & increase competition against “disposables”

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Agree. Many years back I worked on a “real nappy” campaign dealing with this very issue. Modern washable nappies are s easy to use I am surprised they are not more popular.

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May I ask what gender you are K Bird? All your suggestions negatively impact the lives of women of childbearing age.

I am a woman of childbearing age (just) and also a working, single mother.

I’m sorry you feel that my comment unfairly penalises us & interested to know in how you feel it does as that’s not my current view so can only feel I’ve missed something major.

With my child I started out using disposable eco nappies. They were incredibly expensive & washable worked out to be far most cost efficient. I use reusable sanitary products which means I no longer spend money (& tax) on single use. I also now use home made, reusable makeup removing pads and handkerchiefs.

As a parent I feel like I’m constantly washing so adding these reusable items makes no real impact on my day.

I am sorry if I’ve missed something obvious & happy to learn.

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I’m glad the reusables work for you KBird.

I see Paul B claims that washable nappies are ‘so easy to use’ - yet notes that they are not popular.

I think you both underestimate the freedom that these disposables have given women to pursue goals outside the home. I suppose I shall shortly be into buying incontinence pants :-(. Far rather that than being confined at home! I am sure for each of us there are technological developments that we would not willingly relinquish. This suite of plastic ‘offenders’ as you deem them is certainly where I draw the line.

Yes! So many discussions about menstrual hygiene products seem to ignore the sustainable products out there and it is so frustrating. I can’t understand why tampons and pads are still the main product that is marketed everywhere. (#tampontax anyone?). Women’s changing rooms are an ideal advertising spot…

Really? I find use of menstrual cups and cloth sanitary pads completely positive, as do many others. I am a female in my thirties for your information

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Cloth nappies here too- with two children. I’m sure you are aware that the companies producing cloth nappies have a fraction of the marketing budget of procter and gamble etc. Hence a large part of the reason they struggle to get their message out and are not as widely used. To those who have researched and tried they are massively popular. Forsaking a little convenience they benefit the environment, children’s skin, and the parents’ finances. You may draw the line there but it is clearly an area where waste and use of plastic is a huge issue, and clearly the right answer is to address these issues of huge, urgent importance even if it results in inconvenience

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